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My business trip to India - Part 1/6

Kay reports about his exciting journey to India.

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Today, my exciting journey into the unknown world of the Indian subcontinent begins.

But first, I want to introduce myself. My name is Kay and I have worked at K+S for almost 11 years. I started as a trainee in the field of production and technics. In my trainee program, I learned about the technology behind the machines and spent a portion of the program at the Analytik- und Forschungszentrum (AFZ), or the Analytics and Research Center. After I successfully finished the program, I worked as a production engineer. In 2011 I became the manager of the main workshop at the Sigmundshall site. With the establishment of the Central Technical Department, I became Head of Technical Services in Sigmundshall. Since January 2018, I have worked at Innolab Agtech & Nutrition at the headquarters in Kassel.

In my upcoming blog posts, I want to take you on an interesting and exciting business trip to India.

Everything started with a little odyssey in Germany the evening before departure. The weather caused the trains to go out of service, which meant I had to take a taxi to Frankfurt Airport. Despite the adverse weather conditions, the flight was quite enjoyable, and I finally landed in Pune at 12:40 AM local time.

The glimmer of the air pollution was already visible on the approach for landing. The shimmering lights of the city were covered by a swirling carpet of fairy dust. Upon my first step out of the plane, I felt the warm air. The sky was dark but the streets were brightly lit; everything was colorful and vivid. All in all, it was a pleasant first impression at the airport. I was picked up quickly and safely by a driver from the hotel, so I could go to my hotel room in a timely manner in order to get at least a few hours of sleep. 

 

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While lying in bed, I once again recalled why I am actually here. I want to visit the companies involved in agriculture or food, including farmers. We listen to the problems that exist in agriculture. Almost everyone cultivates in traditional ways, however, some farmers have already seen the opportunities that arise from using new methods in order to earn more money.

A positive aspect of Indian exporters is that they know about German regulations and implementations. They know how carefully and precisely the goods are checked on arrival and that if the standards are not met, they will not receive any payment. Moreover, exporters train the supplying farmers to reduce quality aberration.

These chains are to be explored in the next few days and weeks. I am very excited and will continue to report back on my experiences here.

Best regards, Kay

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